Dry Spells (Kemetic Roundtable #02a)

sand in a glass

Dry spells. The Fallow Times. Times when you have absolutely no contact with gods or goddesses. You don’t often hear about them unless you really dig in some of the forums. Why? They’re not that interesting to talk about. “I … Continue reading

Cow Deities in Ancient Egypt? (Pagan Blog Project 2012 #6)

Hathor as Cow

auf deutsch: Kuhgestaltige Gottheiten in Ägypten (übersetzt von Sati) Cow deities. What in the world were those ancient Egyptians thinking? “Cow” doesn’t have many positive associations for us today: fat, ungainly, clumsy. “Bovine” means stupid, dull, inert, stolid, and sluggish. “Bull” … Continue reading

Community in the Kemetic World (Pagan Blog Project 2012 #5)

Community and the Kemetic value of Maat

“The reward of one who does something lies in something being done for him. This is considered by god as ma’at.”-Pharaoh Neferhotep, c.1300 BCE “Ma’at, then, is the principle that forms individuals into communities and that gives their actions meaning … Continue reading

Why Follow an Ancient Religion?

Why DO we worship the gods and goddesses of ancient Egypt? “Why Follow An Ancient Religion?“, from the website of the Kemetic Temple of San Jose (one of two temples that author Richard Reidy is associated with,) might be a … Continue reading

Link: Genesis – more Kemetic Creation stories

I‘ve written several times on creation, A is for Atum being the most recent. For a wider view, Kiya (Darkhawk on eCaludron) has written another excellent post on Kemetic creation, bringing Zep-Tepi into our lives: Genesis. Congratulations to her on … Continue reading

Bathtime! (Pagan Blog Project 2012 #4)

Wash before doing a ritual. In fact, do a ritual for washing! That’s the usual Kemetic practice. Before giving some specifics, let’s take a look at the reasoning behind it. Ritual is something that follows a pattern, and it’s done … Continue reading

Link – Amazing Offering idea!

In ancient Egypt, there was a well-established principle that a replica of something could be a magical stand-in for the real item. Tombs contained miniature houses and boats. Even servants- the ushabti, of course. In temples, the same principle applied. … Continue reading